Research Areas

Faculty Email Contact Listing for Research Areas

This page lists both the classical research areas as well as many specialized topics being investigated by Centre faculty. Click on any topic for a list of faculty who's research interests include that topic.

If you would like to see an alphabetical list of faculty consult the research faculty.

If you are specifically interested in joint research projects you can consult the joint research page.

 

AnalyticalBiochemistryInorganicOrganicPhysicalPolymerTheoretical
Analytical

M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
N.J. Bunce Guelph Organic, Analytical, Electrochemistry
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
T. Gorecki Waterloo Analytical
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
V. Karanassios Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
V. Maheshwari Waterloo Analytical, Physical, Nanoscience
S. Mikkelsen Waterloo Analytical
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
J. Pawliszyn Waterloo Analytical
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
X.W. Tang Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Tremaine Guelph Analytical, Physical
Biochemistry

T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
B. Greenberg Waterloo Biochemistry (Biology)
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
E.M. Meiering Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
M. Palmer Waterloo Biochemistry
Inorganic

M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
S. Lee Waterloo Inorganic
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
L.F. Nazar Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
R.T. Oakley Waterloo Inorganic
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
E. Prouzet Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
P. Radovanovic Waterloo Physical, Inorganic, Nanoscience
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
Organic

F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
M. Barra Waterloo Organic
N.J. Bunce Guelph Organic, Analytical, Electrochemistry
J.M. Chong Waterloo Organic
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
G.I. Dmitrienko Waterloo Organic
E. Fillion Waterloo Organic
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Physical

M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
D. Cory Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
J.D. Goddard Guelph Physical, Theoretical
S. Goldman Guelph Physical, Theoretical
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
R.J. LeRoy Waterloo Theoretical, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
V. Maheshwari Waterloo Analytical, Physical, Nanoscience
T.B. McMahon Waterloo Physical
W.P. Power Waterloo Physical
E. Prouzet Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
P. Radovanovic Waterloo Physical, Inorganic, Nanoscience
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
X.W. Tang Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Tremaine Guelph Analytical, Physical
Polymer

J. Duhamel Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
M. Gauthier Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
Theoretical

M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
J.D. Goddard Guelph Physical, Theoretical
S. Goldman Guelph Physical, Theoretical
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
R.J. LeRoy Waterloo Theoretical, Physical
M. Nooijen Waterloo Theoretical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
 

Specialized Research Areas

Bio-organic/Biological Chemistry
This topic encompasses research at the interface of chemistry and biochemistry which involves attempts to understand biological systems with defined chemical models. This approach can give great insight into enzyme mechanisms and biological systems. This type of research ranges from studies on molecular recognition in model compounds as well as the chemical modification of large biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and carbohydrates.
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Carbohydrate and Nucleosides Chemistry
This topic encompasses research at the interface of chemistry and biochemistry which involves attempts to understand biological systems with defined chemical models involving carbohydrate: mono, oligo or polysaccharides and nucleosides. This approach can give great insight into enzyme mechanisms and biological systems. This type of research ranges from studies on molecular recognition in model compounds as well as the chemical modification of carbohydrates. Research in this area leads to the development of enzymes inhibitors or vaccines to fight bacterial or viral infections as well as cancer.
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Catalysis
Catalysis, i.e., the selective and controlled acceleration of chemical reactions by a catalytically active substance that itself is not changed by the reaction. 90 % of all industrial chemical processes depend on catalysts, without which there would be no artificial fertilizer, no fuel, no drugs, no plastics or any other kind of mass produced item. Ongoing research in catalysis at (GWC)2 is aimed at the rational design and chemical synthesis of better and increasingly sophisticated catalysts, either in solid heterogeneous or molecular dispersed homogeneous, i.e. dissolved form. This will lead to new or improved chemical processes that use less energy, allow the use of alternative raw materials such as biomass or generate less waste. In many cases catalysts give access to entirely new types of molecules and products ranging from new super-strong polymers to optically pure drugs that otherwise could not be manufactured at all.
E. Fillion Waterloo Organic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
Chemical Physics
Description coming soon
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
M. Nooijen Waterloo Theoretical
Chemical and Biosensors
Chemical sensors are molecular devices that combine chemical recognition, based on affinity between chemical structures with an analytical transduction. They provide a new class of inexpensive, portable instrument that permits sophisticated analytical measurements to be undertaken rapidly at decentralized locations. Application areas of chemical sensors include environment monitoring, process control, medical and food quality analysis, etc.

The numerous research programs at (GWC)2 involve programs to develop new sensors including zeolites for water treatment applications, gas sensors (metal oxide based) for environmental applications and highly selective biosensors for specific (bio)molecules, for food analysis and for biomedical applications. Both natural and artificial recognition methods are under evaluation.
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
V. Maheshwari Waterloo Analytical, Physical, Nanoscience
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
S. Mikkelsen Waterloo Analytical
Computational Chemistry
Computational chemistry involves the development and application of computer codes to a reliable and detailed description of chemistry from molecules, to clusters, to solids. Structures, properties and interactions are examined by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, and molecular mechanics methods and by all levels of quantum chemistry from Hartree-Fock to Density Functional Theory to high level multi-reference correlated methods. A number of researchers focus on the applications of computational chemistry to areas such as the band structure of solids, the nmr properties of molecules, and the structures and spectra of reactive intermediates or ions. These computational studies strongly support ongoing experimental programs. Other faculty use molecular dynamics to investigate the conformations of sugars in solution or the interaction of chromophores with large clusters of solvent molecules. The connecting thread is the development and use of modern high performance computing as the research instrument.
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
G.I. Dmitrienko Waterloo Organic
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
J.D. Goddard Guelph Physical, Theoretical
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
R.J. LeRoy Waterloo Theoretical, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
T.B. McMahon Waterloo Physical
M. Nooijen Waterloo Theoretical
R.T. Oakley Waterloo Inorganic
W.P. Power Waterloo Physical
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
Crystallography
Crystallography uncovers the rules used by nature to put together atoms and molecules in the regular structure of a crystal. These rules are obeyed by the hardest inorganic materials and the softest organic solids. Crystallography endows chemists with a magnificent research tool making it possible to see the structure of crystals on the molecular level. Chemical composition and stoichiometry, molecular structure and symmetry, arrangement and dynamics of the molecules in a crystalline solid: the investigation of these properties is targeted by the method. Crystallographic studies are indispensable for the proper characterization and study of materials possessing a high level of structural complexity, as in the case of inclusion compounds and other supramolecular solids. In particular, the crystal structure of inclusion compounds helps to predict the selectivity of the corresponding host materials towards the inclusion or sorption of certain guest molecules, to understand factors responsible for the host-guest complementarity and to explain molecular recognition phenomena in these highly organized systems.
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Drug Design
Drug design focuses on attempts to understand and/or design new molecules to serve as treatments for a variety of medical concerns such as antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal agents. These areas may involve the use of molecular modelling, organic synthesis and enzymology, including molecular biology to allow for the production of sufficient target proteins for inhibitor studies.
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
E. Fillion Waterloo Organic
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Electrochemistry
Electrochemistry embraces a wide range of activities. Electrolysis is the process of bringing about chemical reaction by the passage of an electric current, and within (GWC)2 includes researchers active in developing novel, and often 'green' methods of carrying out organic synthesis, electrochemical deposition of metals, and methods for the remediation of industrial wastes that are resistant to remediation by conventional methods. Electroanalytical methods include the development of sensors based on potentiometric and voltammetric methods, and are intimately concerned with understanding processes of corrosion. Electrochemical processes also involve detailed study of the nature of electrode surfaces; this is important, among other things, in the development of novel batteries and fuel cells. The study of electrochemical processes in the bulk solid (involving electron and ion transport within lattices) is critical to the development of rechargeable Li-ion batteries for portable devices and hybrid electric vehicles, and for fuel cells as well.
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
N.J. Bunce Guelph Organic, Analytical, Electrochemistry
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
S. Mikkelsen Waterloo Analytical
L.F. Nazar Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
Energy: Nuclear, Biomass, Fuel Cells
Description coming soon.
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Tremaine Guelph Analytical, Physical
Environmental Chemistry and Experimental Geochemistry
This research area concerns understanding from a chemical perspective the processes that take place in both natural and contaminated environments, including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Environmental chemistry is the scientific discipline that includes the consideration of the impacts of pollution on the various compartments of the environment, methods of environmental remediation, and the development of new materials and processes intended to avert environmental contamination. Geochemistry is the broad field of science that studies the chemical composition of the Earth and other planets; chemical processes and reactions that govern the composition of rocks and soils; and the cycles of matter and energy that transport the Earth's chemical components in time and space.
N.J. Bunce Guelph Organic, Analytical, Electrochemistry
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
P. Tremaine Guelph Analytical, Physical
Enzymology
Enzymology is the study of the mechanism of action of enzymes using chemical, biochemical and biophysical approaches. Investigations address the factors involved in catalysis by enzymes and in many cases, the development of chemical probes and inhibitors to investigate enzyme function and its importance in biological systems.
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Films and Surfaces
Description coming soon
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Heteroatom Chemistry
The study of non-metal, non-carbon elements and their effects in organic and inorganic transformations. The unique bonding character of atoms such as boron, fluorine, phosphorus, silicon, sulfur and selenium imparts properties and reactivity modes to molecules and reagents that cannot be achieved using simply carbon, oxygen or nitrogen. Studies of molecules containing one of more of these atoms can lead to the invention of new reagents or molecules with new electronic properties.
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
Magnetism and Conductivity
Description coming soon
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Materials
Over the last few decades, advances in technology have arisen owing to major improvements in our ability to process, or physically manipulate, traditional materials by techniques such as lithography. The next generation of technological advances will be achieved through the development of non-traditional solid state, molecular, and polymeric materials with unprecedented properties. The rational design and preparation of new compounds with predictable and controllable mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical, magnetic, etc. properties is the heart of materials research.
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
J. Duhamel Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
M. Gauthier Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
V. Maheshwari Waterloo Analytical, Physical, Nanoscience
L.F. Nazar Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
Mass Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry
Mass Spectroscopy is an analytical technique that is used to quantify known materials, identify unknown compounds, and elucidate structural and physical properties of molecules. Scientists use mass spectroscopy to weigh molecules. Molecules are extremely small and cannot be weighed in the traditional sense on a scale. To give you an estimate of the size of a molecule of water, it would take approximately 60,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 water molecules to fill a tablespoon. We refer to the weight of a molecule as its mass which can be measured 'electronically' by using a mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometers are used in many laboratories throughout the world to analyze thousands of compounds such as those present in our bodies, our environment, our medicines, manufactured materials, foods, poisons, and criminal evidence. Mass spectroscopy is associated with very high speed, sensitivity, and specificity. This means that compounds of interest can rapidly be identified at very low concentrations in chemically complex mixtures. Mass spectroscopy provides valuable information to a wide range of professionals including chemists, biologists, physicians, and astronomers.
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
T.B. McMahon Waterloo Physical
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
Molecular Dynamics
Description coming soon
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
Molecular Electronics
Description coming soon
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Molecular Materials
Molecular materials emerge as a new generation of practically useful materials. The design of molecular materials utilizes molecular assembly processes governed by weak interactions rather than chemical bonds. While preserving their identity, the molecules cooperate and form special arrangements with respect to each other. The resulting systems display high organization on the nano-scale level yielding new macroscopic qualities not seen in a single molecule: magnetic, conductive and optical properties, catalytic activity, specific reactivity, molecular recognition and the ability to include other species.

Molecular materials are expected to become important future alternatives to presently used inorganic solids and organic polymers.

Molecular materials can be synthesized in mild conditions and their properties can be tuned readily in a rational manner through the modification of their structure. The synthesis of new materials with the desired functions, identification of the structure-function relationship, and realization of possible applications are among the goals of current research.
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
Molecular Recognition
This area of study emphasizes the recognition of (and specific interactions with) one molecule by another, like a key fits a specific lock. Research in this area ranges from studies on ligand-protein interactions to host-guest complex formation (with natural or artificial hosts). This type of research involves chemical synthesis of modified ligands (peptides, carbohydrates, nucleotides, small size drugs ...) and their interaction with modified receptors (e.g., proteins, crown ethers...) to identify the key functionalities required for binding. Conformational analysis or the study of the three dimensional shapes of the ligands and receptor are also carried out using a combination of computer assisted molecular modeling and spectroscopic techniques. Measuring the affinity with which each ligand or analogue binds to the receptor is carried out using biochemical, analytical or spectroscopic methods. Principles of molecular recognition are vital for the development of chemical sensors, active substances, protein engineering, and chromatographic separations, for examples.
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
M. Barra Waterloo Organic
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
E.M. Meiering Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
Nanoscience
Nanotechnology is science on the length scale of atoms and molecules where the fundamental properties of materials are determined and can be engineered. By controlling materials at the nanometre scale, one can achieve a greater control over their function and structures so as to discover and explore new physicochemical phenomena e.g. quantum dots, quantum wells, superconductivity of carbon nanotubes. Chemists use the bottom-up approach to nanoscience where designed chemical synthesis creates new molecules. Molecules are assembled to produce new materials; materials are combined to produce novel structures; the resultant structures produce unique function and utility. The contribution of chemists to nanoscience includes synthesis, structural studies, characterization, fabrication of nanodevices and theoretical modelling.
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
D. Cory Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
J. Duhamel Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
M. Gauthier Waterloo Nanoscience, Polymer
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
V. Karanassios Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Liu Waterloo Analytical, Biochemistry, Inorganic, Nanoscience
V. Maheshwari Waterloo Analytical, Physical, Nanoscience
E.M. Meiering Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
L.F. Nazar Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
E. Prouzet Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
P. Radovanovic Waterloo Physical, Inorganic, Nanoscience
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
D. Soldatov Guelph Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
X.W. Tang Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy
This technique exploits the interaction between radio-waves and the magnetic nuclei within molecules and atoms to study molecular structure, electronic structure and the dynamics (motions) of molecules and atoms in liquids, solids and gases. NMR spectroscopists use the chemical shift and J coupling constant, which are familiar to chemists, as well as the dipolar and quadrupolar coupling constants. These parameters are obtained by measurement of spectral peak frequencies, detailed lineshape analyses, and nuclear spin relaxation times (T1 and T2).
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
E.M. Meiering Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
W.P. Power Waterloo Physical
Organometallic Chemistry
Traditionally, organometallic chemistry refers to the study of molecules in which a carbon-metal bond exists. This term, however, is increasingly used to describe any molecular system in which a metal atom is coordinated to an organic ligand, be it through a carbon, oxygen, nitrogen or other main-group element atom. Organometallic complexes are of great importance in the development of homogeneous catalysts, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) materials, molecular magnets, etc. The study of biologically important organometallic species, including metal-protein complexes, is the central theme of most bioinorganic research.
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
E. Fillion Waterloo Organic
K. Preuss Guelph Inorganic
M. Schlaf Guelph Inorganic, Organic, Nanoscience
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
Physical Organic Chemistry
Description coming soon
M. Barra Waterloo Organic
A. Houmam Guelph Analytical, Electrochemistry, Organic, Physical
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
Protein Structure and Function
This area of study encompasses the application of various techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, X-ray crystallography and other approaches to increase our understanding of a protein's structure and function at the atomistic level.
T. Dieckmann Waterloo Biochemistry
J.G. Guillemette Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
E.M. Meiering Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
Quantum Computing
Information processing devices that exploit quantum mechanics are inherently more powerful than classical devices and can operate at the nanoscale where quantum behaviour dominates. The ultimate such device is a Quantum Computer and would consist of many quantum bits (or qubits) on which a universal set of gate operations can be implemented. A quantum computer outperforms a classical one by exploiting quantum effects such as superposition (e.g. a particle can be in multiple places at once) and entanglement (e.g. the famous Bell's inequalities). Since real devices must be implemented in physical systems, worldwide efforts to build quantum computers and other quantum devices have many connections to Chemistry. Some examples of relevant research areas are: novel materials and materials processing, bottom-up approaches to scalable device architectures such as nanoscale templating, and the borrowing of spectroscopic techniques such as optics and spin resonance to coherently control and/or readout quantum information. There are also connections to quantum chemistry: a quantum computer could run exponentially larger quantum simulations than are currently available, and on the other hand, quantum chemistry is useful in the bottom-up design of molecular or solid-state quantum devices.
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
Reactive Intermediates
Reactive Intermediates An understanding of the chemical behaviour of short-lived, transient intermediates translate into predictability and creativity when designing new reactions. Consequently, the fundamentals of learning and understanding reactivity can be learned through the study of unstable species. Investigations in this area use spectroscopic, theoretical and mechanistic tools to garner information about the fate, behavior and structure of reactive intermediates.
M. Barra Waterloo Organic
M.K. Denk Guelph Organometallic, Organic, Theoretical
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
Solid State Chemistry
Solid state chemistry is both fundamental and directed in nature, by virtue of its philosophy to understand structure-property relationships in solids. The conceptual challenge of solid state synthesis through targeted design in order to develop new materials and novel structures, is strongly aligned with the study of their resultant properties in an effort to solve technological needs in this 'materials age' we live in (ie., development of new semiconductors, superconductors, electronic materials, thermoelectrics, magnetic materials, materials for energy storage and conversion, lasers, optoelectronic, and optical materials - all of which are used in just about every device in our modern world). The field also encompasses an exciting and balanced blend of inorganic chemistry (for synthesis); physical and surface chemistry (for the characterization of the solids and their properties) and materials science (to link the materials to device applications). These aspects of discovery, design and fundamental understanding are woven together to create an area that is truly leading edge.
M.D. Baker Guelph Analytical, Inorganic, Nanoscience, Physical
H. Kleinke Waterloo Inorganic, Physical, Nanoscience
L.F. Nazar Waterloo Inorganic, Nanoscience
Spectroscopy and Spectrometry
Description coming soon
J.D. Baugh Waterloo Nanoscience, Physical
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
T.B. McMahon Waterloo Physical
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Surface Science and Analysis
Surface analysis is a modern science whose objectives are to study the structure and composition of surfaces and interfaces. Surface analysis involves many advanced instrumental techniques such as Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) based x-ray electron photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), vacuum based scanning probe microscopies such as scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy as well as spectroscopic methods for in situ studies of the solid-liquid interface that include infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy ( IRRAS) or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Surface Analysis finds applications in the microelectronics industry, tribology, redox protection of metals, energy production, and surface finishing.
K.T. Leung Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
J. Lipkowski Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
P. Rowntree Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
X.W. Tang Waterloo Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
D.F. Thomas Guelph Analytical, Nanoscience, Physical
Synthetic Organic Chemistry
Organic synthesis is a pure and an applied science. The intellectual challenge of pure organic synthesis coupled with the potential to use organic synthesis to help solve real world problems (e.g. synthesis of biologically active compounds such as anticancer, antiviral and antifungal compounds that are difficult or impossible to obtain from the natural; synthesis of novel organic polymers/materials with various industrial applications) continues to attract generation after generation of talented young scholars to the field. The discovery, design and synthesis of new organic molecules and understanding the intricate mechanisms by which they interact leads to exciting advances the field of Organic Synthesis.
J.M. Chong Waterloo Organic
E. Fillion Waterloo Organic
J.F. Honek Waterloo Biochemistry, Nanoscience
A.L. Schwan Guelph Organic
W. Tam Guelph Organic, Theoretical
S. Taylor Waterloo Organic
Theoretical Chemistry
Theoretical chemistry is concerned with the application of fundamental mathematics and physics often through computational algorithms to problems in chemistry. Faculty have particular interests in intermolecular forces, the spectroscopy and dynamics of small molecules, non-adiabatic effects with high level correlated methods, molecular dynamics of polymers, and aspects of symmetry in density functional theory.
R.J. LeRoy Waterloo Theoretical, Physical
J.D. Goddard Guelph Physical, Theoretical
S. Goldman Guelph Physical, Theoretical
M. Nooijen Waterloo Theoretical
P.-N. Roy Waterloo Theoretical, Nanoscience, Physical
Toxicology
Toxicology is the study of the adverse effects on biological systems of both natural and synthetic chemical substances. Aspects of toxicology of particular interest to chemists and biochemists include relationships between molecular structure and toxic potency, and the interactions between toxicants and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, which can lead to either an increase in toxic potency (bioactivation) or to detoxification. The area of mechanistic toxicology has as its goal to delineate the sequence of events that occur between the exposure of an organism to a toxic substance and the appearance of the consequential adverse effects. Complementing the experimental aspects of toxicolepidemiological) studies on exposed and unexposed populations of organisms, whose goal is to uncover whether correlations exist between exposure and the incidence of toxic effects.
N.J. Bunce Guelph Organic, Analytical, Electrochemistry
W. Gabryelski Guelph Analytical
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
R. Manderville Guelph Biological, Organic
S. Mikkelsen Waterloo Analytical
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
Vaccines and Immunochemistry
Carbohydrate-based vaccines are developed against bacterial and viral infections. Students will gain knowledge about vaccine synthesis, animal model studies and immunology.
F.-I. Auzanneau Guelph Biological, Organic
M.A. Monteiro Guelph Analytical, Biological
Two Great Universities - One Great Graduate Program
Guelph-Waterloo Centre for Graduate Work in Chemistry and Biochemistry
Guelph/Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
519-824-4120 x53848
Fax: 519-766-1499